I am an artist who has exhibited throughout the US and Europe, and an educator, who currently teaches drawing and illustration at Parson's the New School for Design.

This is a site for sharing and discussing drawing methods, theories and possibilities, as well as the work of artists from all genres.

Mission statement:
"I do not place value on one school of thinking over another. Each work of art must abide to the principles it sets for itself. As Pollock says: "A work has a life of its own..." I detest imposing a
set of standards upon a work or an artist merely because one has some kind of petty preference (as in "I like this or that") or moral righteousness (as in "things must done in a certain way..."). There is NO certain way! A scribble or a written word has as much value as a highly skilled rendering. To think otherwise is to narrow the possibilities of thinking and making."

Let's look at, talk about, and make some fucking art!
– management

Schedule:
I will be posting on this site, various things related to drawing (and other art forms). There will be a drawing of the day post every day.
On Tuesdays the drawing will be something I have come across in person: as a find of the week post.
Wednesdays will also feature the sketchbook work from the artist of that day's drawing.
On Thursdays I will also feature an artist of the day, perhaps in conjunction with the featured drawing but not necessarily.

The First week of every month with be thematic. Drawings, videos, and all other bits of information will follow these themes, I am open to your suggestions.

20th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Archie McPhee's Endless Geyser of AWESOME! with 3,475 notes

archiemcphee:

Just in time for Easter, here’s a brand new entry from the Department of Extraordinary Eggshell Artists: Polish artist Piotr Bockenheim spends countless hours using a tiny electric drill, an awesomely delicate touch, and immeasurable patience to turn goose egg shells into exquisite sculptures.

Head over to Piotr’s DeviantART gallery to view more.

[via Colossal]

20th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Always in Studio with 12 notes

Source: cosmicgloss

20th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Always in Studio with 154 notes

architectural-review:

The soothing front cover of Mat.Zine issue 11. The illustration is by Stephen Mackie.

architectural-review:

The soothing front cover of Mat.Zine issue 11. The illustration is by Stephen Mackie.

Source: architectural-review

20th April 2014

Photo reblogged from EVERYTHING FLOODING OVER EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME with 190,101 notes

tyleroakley:

Happy Easter!

Haha.

tyleroakley:

Happy Easter!

Haha.

Source: annabellehector

20th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from cybernetic labyrinth with 99 notes

rudygodinez:

Raimund Abraham’s Dream and the House for Euclid, (1983)

(the following is taken from a conversation between Lebbeus Woods and an unnamed journalist)

What do you find most interesting about Mr. Abraham’s “conceptual” work and his drawings? What can other architects learn from it? How can the unbuilt, drawn work contribute to the built realm of architecture?

I’m curious why you choose to put the word conceptual in quotes, as though his entire oeuvre were not conceptual.

First of all, his works—drawn and built—are always visually compelling. Regarding his exploratory drawings, one is immediately struck by their sensuality, their tactility, their originality. They are the very opposite of drawings that attempt to be objective or coolly professional. There are something highly personal, which is very unusual for the drawings of an architect, and this makes them a little frightening. At the same time, they address ideas that allude to the universal, in his use of archetypes—square, cube, circle, sphere, point, line, and plane–for example. The interplay between these supposed extremes creates an inner tension, an existential, dialectical, ultimately tectonic, that is, a constructed, idea of place, time, the world.

Such drawings (and many he has made are in this category) cannot be directly translated into buildings, nor, I imagine, are they intended to. They are not prescriptive and illustrative of some next step, but formulations of principles, grammar, methods of thinking and working. They have much to teach in an explicit way, as I think they have taught architects like Ando, but are impossible to imitate. They have the best kind of influence in that they challenge other architects to find their own integrity, while at the same time showing that this can be achieved in architectural terms.

Are the architectural drawings by Mr. Abraham art or architecture or a hybrid of the two?

This is a misleading question. It takes us into either-or debates which really have nothing to do with his work, drawn or otherwise. In my view his drawings are essentially philosophical, in that they struggle with questions of existence and its meaning. What makes them architecture—or, I should say, Abraham’s architecture–is that they create clear relationships between abstract, tectonic space and form and human experiences and conditions that comprise our existence. As he has said on many occasions, “architecture must confront a program,” which I take to mean a program for inhabiting particular spaces and their contexts.

Source: rudygodinez

18th April 2014

Photo reblogged from α with 55 notes

onereedyear:

Joseph Mallord William Turner - Figures on a Beach

onereedyear:

Joseph Mallord William Turner - Figures on a Beach

Source: onereedyear

15th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Mondrian-Techno with 1,647 notes

eyecaging:

ivany86/Ivan Laliashvili    Human Anatomy Studies

Source: eyecaging

15th April 2014

Photo

William T. Wiley Mr Sillyhead in Whack & Blight2009direct to plate photogravure with acrylic and mixed media

William T. Wiley 
Mr Sillyhead in Whack & Blight
2009
direct to plate photogravure with acrylic and mixed media

15th April 2014

Photo

Mr Sillyhead in Whack & Blight, 2009direct to plate photogravure with acrylic and mixed mediaWilliam T. Wiley

Mr Sillyhead in Whack & Blight, 2009
direct to plate photogravure with acrylic and mixed media
William T. Wiley

15th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Tumblr-ing down the rabbit hole with 51,786 notes

Source: boyirl